Article: My Year In Hell at Hubspot


(Andrew Chen) #1

Pretty brutal.
http://quibb.com/links/my-year-in-startup-hell-at-hubspot/view

Comments on the article are interesting too:
http://quibb.com/links/my-year-in-startup-hell-at-hubspot


(Barry W. Enderwick) #2

Sorry, but the way this excerpt is written is telling. Nothing about it is even handed and even displays a willful ignorance (email list created vs. spam). It is clear to me that he did not enter the job open-minded and has decided in retrospect that everything they do is awful. No company is perfect but the problem clearly stems from it not being a good fit for either party.

I will say that the conflagration between “mission statement” and “brand position” that I keep running into at startups is problematic. A mission is your broader reason for existing as a company (e.g "To make effective inbound marketing accessible to everyone), your brand position is what you want consumers to think of when they they think of your company/service (e.g. “Business growth though easy-to use, effective and engaging inbound marketing”). Btw, I just made those examples up but in reality the brand position should always be a distillation based on consumer research.


(Jeff Atwood) #3

Yeah, any startup that hired Dan “Fake Steve Jobs” Lyons surely knew what it was signing up for, yes?

I did really enjoy season 2 of Silicon Valley which was a dramatically better show than season 1 thanks to his influence. (To be fair, the season 1 finale was so ridiculously good it almost justified every other episode.)